The Excitement of European Football in Your Family Room

Who would not love to be able to bring the excitement of European football to your family room? This is something that can easily be done with the addition of a game table to your home. Bring in all kinds of friends to make your day and night full of fun and excitement.

This is possible with a table that is designed to look just like a European football stadium. Imagine being able to pretend that you are your favorite soccer club while facing your friend or sibling across from you on the table battling for football supremacy. Here is where you will be able to make your ultimate fantasy come to life as you kick the winning goal in the final seconds to win the championship.

Try to find the perfect spot in your home to be able to set up the table and keep it accessible year round. Who says you will have to brave the elements to enjoy a good game of football as you can have all of the fun you are looking for right from the comfort of your family room on your indoor table.

With all of the features and the intricate design of the table in an effort to create an authentic stadium look who would not want to play on the table. The game play is the same as any other football table. However, you will be the talk of the group as yours will look and play so much better because it would carry the name of official. How would you feel at the drop of the ball and everyone holds their breath in anticipation as you and your opponent spin the handles to control the ball and to send it into your opponents goal.

That is a feeling that cannot be matched. You will be able to hold superiority over all of your friends and family, organizing table football tournaments in your home all because of your football table. Being able to try and reenact the game as it is on television while you are watching. These are just some of the things you can consider and enjoy while you are playing on your table. Make the most of it and try to keep the fun and interest going by setting new rules or making challenges as far as time of first goal to how long one can maintain a shutout. Most of all have fun.

UEFA – Union of European Football Associations

Introduction: Background and History
Confederation name: Union of European Football Associations
Acronym: UEFA
Established date: 15 June 1954 A.D
Date of first congress: 2 March 1955
Headquarter: Nyon, Switzerland
First General Secretary: Henri Delaunay
First President: Ebbe Schwartz
Headquarter(s): Paris, France (1954 – 1959)
Bern, Switzerland (1959 – 1995)
Nyon, Switzerland (1995 onwards)
Headquarter of UEFA at Nyon, Switzerland

UEFA, the Union of European Football Associations is one of the six continental football federations. Among the six confederations that are part of FIFA, UEFA stands as the wealthiest one. It certainly has the strongest influence on football all over the world as World’s top players play for the European power houses. UEFA was established with the common task to oversee and organize league and national team competitions in European region. This continental football federation was formed as the result of the discussion of Italian, French and Belgian football associations hosted by Switzerland in Basel, Switzerland. Hence, UEFA started its top journey from June 15, 1954 with the governing body consisting Henri Delaunay to stand as the first General Secretary and Ebbe Schwartz as the first president. UEFA had it’s headquarter located in Paris until 1959 when it moved to Bern and then finally to Nyon, Switzerland in 1995. UEFA has been organizing various leagues and tournament for both men and women. It organizes both nation’s competitions as well nation wide and continent wide club competitions. It organizes various prestigious competitions like UEFA Champion’s League, Euro Cup, UEFA Cup etc. These leagues and tournament’s growing popularity is certainly making this confederation stronger and influencing than ever.

UEFA began with just 3 full time staffs which have increased to 340 people of more than 29 different nationalities. UEFA employs administrators, secretaries, IT specialist, coaches, journalists, translators at its administrative HQ. This shows that UEFA certainly is the top confederation. It has been able to tune itself into a dynamic organization to cope with the vast requirements of the modern-day football. UEFA had 23 member associations in the beginning; there are now 53 associations under UEFA.

UEFA Executive Committee:

An executive committee governs UEFA. The executive committee of UEFA comprises of UEFA president and 15 other members elected by UEFA congress. The Executive Committee does not include more than one member from the same member association. The committee does the work of making decisions on all matters which do not fall within the legal or statutory jurisdiction of the UEFA Congress or another organ. It manages UEFA. It has several duties like overall control of UEFA and the issuing of necessary instructions, definition of organizational structure etc.

The Executive Committee also appoints general secretary who keeps the responsibility of organization management and direction of the UEFA administration.

President: Michel Platini
Vice Presidents: Senes Erzik
Ángel María Villar Llona
Giancarlo Abete
Geoffrey Thompson
Marios N Lefkaritis
Members: Sergey Fursenko
Allah Hansen
Avraham Luzon
Mircea Sandu
Michael van Praag
Dr Theo Zwanziger
Grigoriy Surkis
Borislav Mihaylov
František Laurinec
Peter Gilliéron
General Secretary: Gianni Infantino

Member nations:

The confederation was established with the initial membership 25 national associations but the present number of members is 53. The number gradually increased after 1990, Soviet Union broke into various states and became USSR. The 53 member nations along with their IOC code have been listed below.

Albania (ALB)
Andorra (AND)
Armenia (ARM)
Austria (AUT)
Azerbaijan (AZE)
Belarus (BLR)
Belgium (BEL)
Bosnia Herzegovina (BIH)
Bulgaria (BUL)
Croatia (CRO)
Cyprus (CYP)
Czech Republic (CZE)
Denmark (DEN)
England (ENG)
Estonia (EST)
Faroe Island (FRO)
Finland (FIN)
france (FRA)
Fyr Macedonia (MKD)
GEORGIA (GEO)
GERMANY (GER)
GREECE (GRE)
HUNGARY (HUN)
ICELAND (ISL)
ISRAEL (ISR)
ITALY (ITA)
KAZAKHSTAN (KAZ)
LATVIA (LVA)
LIECHTENSTEIN (LIE)
LITHUANIA (LTU)
LUXEMBOURG (LUX)
MALTA (MLT)
MOLDOVA (MDA)
MONTENEGRO (MNE)
NETHERLAND (NED)
NORTHERN IRELAND (NIR)
NORWAY (NOR)
POLAND (POL)
PORTUGAL (POR)
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND (IRL)
ROMANIA (ROU)
RUSSIA (RUS)
SAN MARINO (SMR)
SCOTLAND (SCO)
SERBIA (SRB)
SLOVAKIA (SVK)
SLOVENIA (SVN)
SPAIN (ESP)
SWEDEN (SWE)
SWITZERLAND (SUI)
TURKEY (TUR)
UKRAINE (UKR)
WALES (WAL)

At Football – Soccer Matches In The Top European Football Leagues -Should There Be Four Linesmen

I have watched football all my life and would probably say I have an unhealthy obsession with the game and like all fans I have my own ideas of how to improve it. My main bugbear though is the linesman/referees assistant.

In the top flight in countries like England, Italy and Spain where money is available for it why do we only have two linesmen? Surely it makes sense to have four? Then they can make better judgements on calls on whether the ball crossed the line or not. Also it should increase the likelihood of an attacker getting the benefit of the doubt in offside calls if players are only given offside when both linesmen raise their flags.

But the main reason I have for pushing for four linesmen is because a referee needs their help. The four linesman could then pick up on shirt pulling, elbows and other goings on that goes on out of view of the referee.

What annoys me the most is the blatant body checks and shirt pulls that go on out of view of the referee to stop a player making a run in behind a defender. I do get sick of the media telling me that seeing players sent off spoils the game when to my mind what spoils the game are the cynical so-called ‘clever’ fouls that stop an attacker in full flow for very little punishment.

Plus I believe that if players got harsher punishment for those sort of fouls they would be a lot less likely to commit them in the first place. I do not believe they would lead to more bookings and red cards overall, just a lowering of cynical fouls.

After all they said the outlawing of the tackle from behind would lead to most games ending with at least one player being sent off but as we have seen all that has happened is that the players have altered their game to compensate for the rule changes.

The other thing, is that a linesman will then always be on the right side of the pitch – unlike now where players can get away with taking corners out of the quadrant etc because the linesman is on the other side of the pitch.

Apart from little modifications like this though I personally feel football has no need to change. Certainly I would hate to see the referee losing the power he currently has as while it might reduce the potential for corruption it would also lose the talking points that the ref provides by making human errors.

Lets face it we all want to talk about the referee not giving or giving a crucial penalty, missing a foul etc which gives us an easy excuse for our team losing rather than admitting it wasn’t good enough to beat the opposition.

After all who does not believe that their team is the greatest team there is? We all know that at every level, the fans chant that their team is the greatest the world has seen even though we know it isn’t true, we still believe it.

Having said that it would be an improvement if the match officials, a representative of the two clubs that have just played, and an independent official all sat down after a match and went through the match video checking their decisions. The club officials could then query decisions that the clubs disagreed with and retrospective punishments or reprieves could be handed out by the match referee.